Vehicle

Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV)

Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) are powered by an internal combustion engine or other propulsion source that can be run on conventional or alternative fuel and an electric motor that uses energy stored in a battery. HEVs combine the benefits of high fuel economy and low emissions with the power and range of conventional vehicles.

Hybrid electric vehicles are powered by an internal combustion engine and an electric motor, which uses energy stored in batteries. The extra power provided by the electric motor allows for a smaller engine, resulting in better fuel economy without sacrificing performance.

A hybrid electric vehicle does not require a plug to charge the battery. Instead, it uses regenerative braking and the internal combustion engine to charge. The vehicle captures energy normally lost during braking by using the electric motor as a generator and storing the captured energy in the battery. The energy from the battery provides extra power during acceleration.

They can be parallel or series. Parallel plug-in hybrids connect the engine and the electric motor to the wheels through mechanical coupling. Both the electric motor and the engine can drive the wheels directly. On the other hand, series plug-in hybrids use only the electric motor to drive the wheels. The internal combustion engine is used to generate electricity for the motor.

Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV)

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles have an internal combustion engine and electric motor. These vehicles are powered by an alternative fuel or a conventional fuel, such as gasoline, and a battery, which you can plug in to charge.

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles have an internal combustion engine or other propulsion source and an electric motor, which uses energy stored in batteries. PHEVs have a larger battery pack than hybrid electric vehicles. This makes it possible to drive for an extended range using just electricity (about 10 to 40 miles in current models), commonly referred to as the “all-electric range” of the vehicle.

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle batteries can be charged by an outside electric power source, by the internal combustion engine, or through regenerative braking. During braking, the electric motor acts as a generator, using the energy to charge the battery.

They can be parallel or series. Parallel plug-in hybrids connect the engine and the electric motor to the wheels through mechanical coupling. Both the electric motor and the engine can drive the wheels directly. On the other hand, series plug-in hybrids use only the electric motor to drive the wheels. The internal combustion engine is used to generate electricity for the motor.

Extended Range Electric Vehicle (EREV)

Extended Range Electric Vehicles (EREV) function and drive like electric vehicles, but additional operational time or range is provided by a second on-board fuel source and associated fuel converter. To qualify as an EREV, the vehicle must be able to complete an urban dynamometer driving schedule (UDDS) drive cycle without assistance from range-extending technology.

Full Function Electric Vehicle (FFEV)

A Full Function Electric Vehicle uses a battery and an electric motor to power its drive train and has over 100 miles of range. They draw their propulsion power solely from electricity stored on board in batteries that can be charged using a home electrical outlet.

Source: Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center